Volume 5, Issue 3-1, May 2017, Page: 5-8
Cyanobacteria Spirulina Platensis Basic Protein C-Phycocyanin and Zn(II) Ions
Eteri Gelagutashvili, E. Andronikashvili Institute of Physics, I. Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi, Georgia
Received: Jul. 21, 2016;       Accepted: Jul. 25, 2016;       Published: Sep. 14, 2016
DOI: 10.11648/j.nano.s.2017050301.12      View  2917      Downloads  97
Abstract
The interaction of Zn(II) ions with cyanobacteria Spirulina platensis basic protein C-phycocyanin (C-PC) is studied by fluorescence spectroscopy.Stern–Volmer quenching constant value for Zn(II)–C-PC is determined. The binding energy of Zn(II) ions with C-phycocyanin is determined using equilibrium dialysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy. Cooperative binding of Zn(II) ions with C-phycocyanin is observed. The binding constants diminished with increasing ionic strength, suggesting an adaptive protective response. "Nonelectrostatic" and polyelectrolyte components of binding free energy for Ag+, Cu2+, Cr3+, Pb2+, Ni2+, and Zn2+–C-phycocyanin (Spirulina platensis) complexes are determined. It is shown that "nonelectrostatic" component of binding free energy is dominating at the metal–C-PC interaction, while the polyelectrolyte contribution being less important, and the "nonelectrostatic" forces contribution for Ag+–C-phycocyanin (Spirulina platensis) complexes exceeds that for other metal ions.
Keywords
C-phycocyanin, Zn Ions, Binding Constant
To cite this article
Eteri Gelagutashvili, Cyanobacteria Spirulina Platensis Basic Protein C-Phycocyanin and Zn(II) Ions, American Journal of Nano Research and Applications. Special Issue: Nanotechnologies. Vol. 5, No. 3-1, 2017, pp. 5-8. doi: 10.11648/j.nano.s.2017050301.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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